It’s okay to gain weight in isolation

pixpoetry-IDAX5vKLVLI-unsplash

I’ve seen many a meme about weight gain in isolation. Which although funny and I relate really isn’t okay. Why?

Because these memes make it seem as though weight gain is something undesirable during this time and can be triggering for people recovering from eating disorders such as myself. We’re already in an unprecedented situation which is quite stressful for many people, this in itself can make it much harder for people in recovery from eating disorders to maintain that recovery. Memes, jokes and TikToks about the weight we’re all going to gain in this time simply isn’t helpful and may be enough to tip someone over the edge.

So I thought I’d pop in here and say that it is okay to gain weight during this time. Partly to reassure myself but also to reassure others.

We are going through a collective trauma. It’s only natural to eat more. Eat more “junk food” I hate that term, all food is good food in moderation. And we may be unable to eat as much fresh food as we would like. So yes, when combined with a reduced activity level due to gyms being closed and a lack of motivation/energy because we’re going through a collective trauma we may gain weight during this time.

But that’s okay. We are not defined by our weight. When was the last time you chose your friends based on their weight?

Hopefully never. We are worth so much more than our outward appearance.

From a health perspective yes being obese can give rise to health complications. But our bodies all have a set point, and you are unlikely to go much above that during this time. Furthermore, any weight you have gained is likely to naturally come off once this is all over.

From a health perspective, giving into restrictive eating disorder tendencies is going to be more damaging. Studies have consistently shown that being underweight is more damaging than being slightly overweight and coping mechanisms such as purging can actually be really dangerous and affect your electrolyte levels as well as risk damaging your esophegous and teeth.

It is okay to gain weight. It is okay to stick to your meal plan even if you think your less active and don’t need it. It is okay to eat what you want. There is nothing wrong with that chocolate, those biscuits or those crisps.

All food is good food and you deserve to eat it. Be kind to yourself. Just getting through the day is enough.

 

Living with chronic illness in lockdown

sandie-clarke-qy2sOz_RAyo-unsplash

Many have said that lockdown gives the normal healthy population a taste of what it’s like to be chronically ill. The constant missing of something and the loss of purpose is very similar to what happens when you get a chronic illness. Especially one that causes you to lose your job, lose friends and end up largely housebound.

You could say that us chronically ill folks have been equipped to the challenges of social isolation.

However, social isolation and lockdown can bring up it’s own challenges.

Suddenly the whole world is trying to get fit and make gains by working out at home. Trying to be productive whilst in lockdown.

Doing all the things we wish we could spend our days doing but can’t.

I wish I could bake more than a super simple no mess recipe without payback. I wish I could spend an entire day reading. I can read for 10-20 minutes without having to take a break and can’t sustain that throughout the day. I wish I could delve into a new series and binge it in a day. Actually watching it, following it. Instead of dozing throughout and having it on in the background.

I wish I could spend hours perfecting tiktok dances. Instead one attempt and my chest acts up for a good hour.

Without discussing the fact that atleast in the UK able bodied people can have one exercise session outdoors a day there are so many things able bodied people can do whilst remaining at home.

I can understand the anger of some people in the chronic illness community over able bodied moaning in this regard, because seeing and knowing everything that can be done from home leaves you with the feeling that your yet again missing out.

The rhetoric that we have to learn a new skill, start a business and get fit in lockdown can make us feel like we’re not good enough.

Let alone difficulties some of us have in finding food delivery slots. I’m lucky I have a little Tesco express opposite me. But I would be unable to walk 10 minutes to the nearest supermarket then queue up outside the supermarket and then do my shopping and carry it home right now due to the flare I’m in. That trip was always exhausting without the flare and the queue.

However lockdown has also done good things for people with chronic illnesses. Suddenly we’re feeling more included and more connected to people as the world switches to embracing virtual communication and forms of socialisation.

For some of us, our quality of life has improved because this social aspect has come back into play.  I myself am feeling relived that I don’t have to overextend myself to look like a normal 22 year old. There’s less FOMO and less having to say no or saying yes and paying the price.

The switch to having to work from home and school from home is hopefully going to make lasting changes that lead to the world being more accessible for those with chronic illness and allow us to reach our full potential and I’d  like to think that people are now going to be more understanding towards people with chronic illness. Once they realise that getting to stay at home all day isn’t “lucky”. One can hope for a positive change from all this right?

How are you finding this period of social distancing?

 

Finding the positives in lockdown

stephanie-harvey-PPA6wsuedeM-unsplash

The UK has been in lockdown since Monday evening. As I’ve been symptomatic and therefore in isolation. Today, before I realised I still had a fever and so should still isolate I went on an outing.

Only to the pharmacy two minutes from me, to get my prescriptions which I would have otherwise ran out of and to the Tesco opposite my flat to get milk and cereal. I have a food delivery tomorrow so I just needed some easy to eat stuff to tide me over as I’m not feeling 100% up to proper food.

The world has changed a lot in the last 8 days. I knew that, I’ve been watching the news but nothing could prepare me for that first step outdoors. That taste of freedom. Only a taste because fever means isolate past 7 days but bitterness aside…

I live in a city centre, a normally bustling, vibrant city centre. I live next to a pub and in close vicinity to many others. I normally hear people, music, cars. When I go into town it’s normally busy, even at 10am on a Saturday morning it’s busier than it was today.

Today it was pretty much dead. Yes I could see people, and certain people not abiding by the two meter rule but it was comparatively dead. There was tape down and barriers up in boots. No forms to sign when picking up medication.

It was like I got back from work 8 days ago to a normal functioning world. Yeah the situation was getting serious and the climbing walls had closed but the pub was open and busy as ever. The streets were also busy as ever.

And then I came out in some dystopian future. Some alternate universe.

As someone who was largely bedbound for 2 years I do sometimes forget how much of a change this is. But going out today made me realise that this virus has lead to all of us taking huge sacrifices. Huge lifestyle changes and it’s forced us to stop and slow down.

I certainly welcome that. I hope others will to. If I had to go work today because I’d already self isolated for 7 days and didn’t realise I had a fever this morning my body wouldn’t be coping. My body would just get the next virus, the next infection, the next injury. This year I’ve climbed so hard that I’ve had three relatively minor finger injuries, my hamstring and knee ligament injury which will take a couple of months to fully heal, an elbow injury, ankle injuries and many other lil niggles. I’ve pushed through work, tried to become a lawyer and since the end of January I’ve had a cold, a stomach virus, an ear infection, numerous bladder infections and now this virus, be it COVID-19 or not. My immune system isn’t as good as it was pre ME but it’s never normally that bad.

I was running my body into the ground. I haven’t worked a 5 day week all month. More like 3 day weeks maybe 4. This virus. Not just because I may have it but because of it’s effect on the country has forced me to slow down. It’s forced me to give my body what it wants. A chance to heal. A chance to function within my limits and to come back to work revitalised.  A chance to focus on rebuilding my body off of the wall, at a lower intensity and focusing on dealing with muscle imbalances so that when the walls open again I get less injuries.

It’s also given me a chance to reflect. To indulge in my off wall passions and think about what’s really important to me. And funnily enough, I’ve had more time to connect. Connect to people I’ve neglected in the past.

The situation is awful. For everyone. I know I’ve been feeling extra unwell these past eight days. The horrific cough, the breathing difficulties – not enough to need help but enough to feel like I can’t get enough air. Enough to mean I can’t sing or proof read my essay aloud like I normally would. The fever. I’ve also been extra weak and dizzy. I’ve spent the majority of these days horizontal on the couch and have intermittently had to crutch around as my legs have been so weak that I’ve needed to take that weight off them to get to the bathroom without crawling.

We’re all affected by this. Either directly or indirectly. But good will come from it and god will help us through.