How it Feels to be Left off The List

I have ME/CFS. A poorly understood neuroimmune condition that is often triggered by and exacerbated by a virus. With ME we are entitled to a flu vaccine. We have known we are vulnerable but not extremely vulnerable to COVID-19 since the start of this pandemic. Yet many people with ME are not being put in group six or are having to contact MPs, CCG’s and Journalists to get it done because despite letter templates from the ME Association and Action for ME. Despite other ME charities saying we are vulnerable and should be in group six we are an awkward grey area.

In Wales I’d be in group six. In Scotland I’d be in group six. But England. It’s up to our GP’s. ME unaware GP’s. GP’s under a lot of pressure because there are many people enquring about the vaccine and probably rightfully. A multitude of people have been left off the list.

I am one of those people. Despite ME/CFS, EDS,Fibromialga, Chronic Migraines, Occipital Neuralgia, suspected Endometriosis and suspected POTS (largely controlled by migraine meds) my surgery won’t put me into group six. This is despite a bad reaction to potentially having the virus in March. Going from being able to work and climb. Yes I was barely holding it together but I was there. In the office. On the wall. Climbing multiple V3s-4s a session and climbing 6C on a rope, often ticking off multiple 6Bs and 6B+’s.

I went from that. to being unable to walk around my flat without crutches until I started d-ribose. To barely being eyes open and pretending to be functional, pretending to hold it together for 8 hours a day. In a dark room. Horizontal. Suddenly sleeping till midday without an alarm (which I have never done). Increased nausea, my diet has changed drastically and although initially caused weight loss has since caused weight gain since I’ve figured out how to keep my digestive system as happy as possible. Fatigue, head pressure, migraines, brain fog. Muscle weakness. Increased numbness and tingling. More issues with balance and co-ordination. Forgetting how to walk more often. Spilling coffee because god forbid could I ever carry a cup straight. Missing my mouth when I drink. I started developing seemingly random allergies. KT tape, adhesive heat pads, plasters, make up wipes. Some currently unidentified allergies. Anti-histimines have become a staple. My skin manifestations of EDS have worsened. Healing slower, marking more. My hands currently look like I’ve had a reaction to the pavement. A pavement that not much weight went onto.

I’m still no where near where I was this time last year and have a neurology appointment in may to deal with neuro stuff that started getting worse after the virus. The GP who referred me thinks it could me MS but right now no one knows. Is it EDS related, is it MS or am I just going to end up with being told it’s ME or Functional Neurological Disorder?

My chronically sick body reacted badly. This is standard for viruses with ME. I got freshers flu in my second year of uni and was on a downhill trend from there. Even colds can make us worse for a few weeks.

Yet when I sent an email using the ME Association template asking to be put in group six, I was asked to call to book a GP appointment. At which point I was dismissed. And not nicely either. It was made out as if the setback from ME wasn’t actually that bad, that if they said yes to me they would have to say yes to people with depression. (Severe mental health issues are in fact a reason to put someone into group six). Told people with asthma aren’t in group six so I definitely shouldn’t be (again people with asthma shouldn’t be left out but here we are). I was made to feel like a burden. Like a waste of time. Like I was making it all up.

I came off of the phone in tears. I should be offered the vaccine by the end of July but what if that’s too late. With the world opening up again and people going in and out more. I live with four other people. My healthy parents will be vaccinated before me and hopefully that’ll protect me a little but my brothers are children and so won’t be. It’s the knowledge that I either miss out or put myself at risk. The knowledge that once we don’t have to social distance at the climbing wall it may not be safe for me. The theatre tickets in July that are already bought so I have to go. But if masks are no longer needed in July will I be safe in central london?

The fear of another serious set back when yes I’m lucky to be as functional as I am but I’m here pushing through extreme symptoms because I feel some external pressure too. It can’t get much worse otherwise I’ll be unable to finish my masters.

It worryingly seems like the younger of us are the ones having this issue. It makes no sense why even if not group six we can’t just be put somewhere higher than group 12. We are at risk. We know we are. But when things are at the doctors discretion and you meet a bad egg or an egg that doesn’t understand your conditions there’s not much you can do other than find an egg who understands. Most of us don’t have that energy. Or go to our MP’s and CCG’s. Again most of us have lives we’re desperately trying to hold together. I definitely don’t have that energy right now. Physically or emotionally.

I feel hurt. I feel scared. I feel forgotten. I feel alone in this and like no one will understand because the media isn’t shouting about it. Instead we have government propaganda suggesting all vulnerable people will be vaccinated by April.

That’s not true. So many are left off the list.

I am one of them.

A week in my life in Lockdown (ft mental health and chronic illness)

Monday

I focused down on trying to get my mandatory uni work done for the week so I could focus in on revision and getting ahead on prep for the rest of the week. I tried to ground myself with worship music. Anything that takes the edge off the depression is good. I had stage one of my autism assessment, which I got really anxious about but came out positively. Confirming I am likely autistic and having arranged a full assessment. My bank account isn’t happy but it’s a matter I need closure on. I skipped my physio exercises which I was going to do whilst running a bath because I was too depressed. Sometimes that depression paralysis just gets you and takes you. I had a bath, watched spinning out, planned my week and then stayed up a little too late doing a little research for my Case Study project on a subject I’m really passionate about.

Tuesday

I got up early as I had a meeting and the dog has taken to being particularly needy in the mornings. I came out of the meeting positive and glad that I have a resource to go to for any career related questions. Sometimes you forget how important social interaction is and maybe that’s because I’m probably autistic and some social interaction is very draining. But I was actually energised and positive coming out of it until the high crashed and the depression swarmed over me again. My pain was bad and muscles tight from skipping physio and productivity was difficult. Sometimes I just feel like I’m drowning and there’s no way out. More worship music to ground. Helped but still no focus.

Wednesday

No wifi, no laptop. Tried to study without and didn’t get as far as I would have liked. I went for a walk/run and embaressed myself by failing to traverse a kids traverse wall but the slippy muddy trainers and holds + the dog in one arm made it a challenge. It gave me so much serotonin though so watch me embarrass myself in a kids playpark with a secondhand pair of climbing shoes. Muddy trainers+muddy holds are hard! And then more tears the feeling of having another barrier stacked up against you when you already face so many is hard!

Thursday

More tears. Family being insensitive and not realising how much I hurt. We do love it. I stupidy went on another walk and wasted time. Yeah it’s good to help keep my muscles loose and not sore but already feeling so behind that two hours from driving time and tesco + the walk felt unjustified. This is why I don’t go out with my family. I had a therapy assessment and told my depression is moderately severe. It was hard but hopefully I’ll be able to get some support soon and start feeling better.

Friday

Payback but having to push through. Unable to see properly, feel legs, pressure headache worse than usual. Went from despairingly low to hyper. Spent a few hours doubled up on the floor with ovulation pain. Had a dance round my room in a hyper moment. Pain came back, had a bath to ease it a little because even co-codomal wouldn’t touch it and did some volunteering.

Saturday

Endo is a bitch ft more payback and lots of drop attacks. I started some negotiation prep after revising and practicing my assessment.

Sunday

Bladder flares, endo flares idk what but it felt like something was pressing down on my pelvis and everything hurt. My bod is not a fun bod sometimes. I did more revision and practice for my assessment. I started spinning out all over again because Justin and Kat’s love gives me serotonin, Dasha is queen and Carol is a bitch but her workwear is goals and her comments sometimes make me laugh. I actually felt pretty good mentally on Sunday, which was refreshing.

Lets talk disability classification in para sports

The IFSC (international federation for sport climbing) has recently stated they are moving to IPC classifications from 2021.

This separates athletes into the following 10 eligible impairments:

  • Impaired Muscle Power – Athletes with Impaired Muscle Power have a Health Condition that either reduces or eliminates their ability to voluntarily contract their muscles in order to move or to generate force. Examples of eligible impairments are paraplegia, a spinal cord injury, post – polio syndrome and spina bifida
  • Impaired Passive Range of Movement – Athletes with Impaired Passive Range of Movement have a restriction or a lack of passive movement in one or more joints. This may result from contracture resulting from chronic joint immobilisation or trauma 
  • Limb Deficiency – Athletes with Limb Deficiency have total or partial absence of bones or joints as a consequence oftrauma (for example traumatic amputation), illness (for example amputation due to bone cancer) or congenital limb deficiency (for example dysmelia).
  • Leg Length Difference – Athletes with Leg Length Difference have a difference in the length of their legs as a result of a disturbance of limb growth, or as a result of trauma.
  • Short Stature – Examples of an Underlying Health Condition that may lead to Short Stature include achondroplasia, growth hormone dysfunction, and osteogenesis imperfecta. 
  • Hypertonia – Athletes with Hypertonia have an increase in muscle tension and a reduced ability of a muscle to stretch caused by damage to the central nervous system. This may be as a result of Cerebral Palsy, a Traumatic Brain Injury or a stroke.
  • Ataxia – Athletes with Ataxia have uncoordinated movements caused by damage to the central nervous system. This may be caused by the conditions/events listed in hypertonia or by MS.
  • Athetosis – Athletes with Athetosis have continual slow involuntary movements. The examples listed by IPC here are Cerebral Palsy, a traumatic brain injury and stroke.
  • Vision impairment – reduced or no vision caused by damage to the optic nerves or optical pathways or visual cortex of the brain.
  • Intellectual impairment – Athletes with an Intellectual Impairment have a restriction in intellectual functioning and adaptive behaviour in which affects conceptual, social and practical adaptive skills required for everyday life. This Impairment must be present before the age of 18. 

It then goes to list a number of categories of health conditions that are not underlying health conditions. These are as follows:

  1. Conditions that primarily cause pain (fibromyalgia, CRPS, Myofascial pain syndrome)
  2. Conditions that primarily cause fatigue (ME/CFS)
  3. Primarily cause hypermobility or hypotonia (EDS)
  4. Primarily psychological or psychosomatic in nature (Conversion disorders or PTSD)

So what are the problems with this?

a) Using the same basic criteria for a range of sports excludes people who can’t run due to pain/fatigue/joint instability can and has excluded people from wheelchair basketbal, tennis and other sports that rely on either being able to run or use a wheelchair.

b) It’s completely misunderstanding ME/CFS. Take me for example. I have reduced sensation in my legs, feet and left hand often. But unless I get scans and lumber punctures to see if it’s something brain/cci related and they come back with something I’d probably be excluded from para-sports purely because the IPC thinks my condition is primarily fatigue when fatigue is the tip of the iceberg. It’s unbearable pressure in the base of my skull, dizziness, difficulty with positional changes, reduced sensation, extreme muscle weakness and reduced power in my legs and I’ve always had poor proprioception and co-ordination. Although this isn’t an issue for me right now. I’m not well enough to compete in any sport and do my very intense masters course it would be nice to have the option and it hurts that yet another organisation is failing to properly understand ME/CFS.

c)Expressly excluding EDS (unless the athlete also has an eligible impairment + EDS) is wrong. Yes it fluctuates and athletes with EDS may need regular evaluations and some wouldn’t even fall within para categories if they were amended but EDS impairs ability to perform in a variety of ways. Our hyper-mobile joints means it takes more power to do what a non hyper-mobile person can, we often have issues with fatigue, brain fog and positional changes. We can have poor proprioception and get frequently injured.

d) It’s not considering everything else that can impair ability to perform that comes with a “Non-eligible” underlying health condition. The fatigue, brain fog, inability to concentrate, the pain, slow healing, dizzyness. These are all real issues and I know they can be hard to quanitify but nevertheless there should be an option for those who fall outside the 10 categories that doesn’t make the competition unfair for people within the 10 categories.

e) For an organisation that preaches accessibility and inclusivity in sports it just doesn’t feel right to have this list of non eligible impairments.

f) People who have worked for years to get to where they are, are now being exlcuded from competing. Their career ending prematurely due to some critieria.

So? What should change? I understand the need for strict measurable criteria to ensure the competition is fair for everyone. Especially in sports where it comes down to a tenth of a second or point. It’s definitely hard to find the balance. But I think there is a way to include everyone whose disability impacts their sport and wants to compete and is able to get to the required standard.

I think different sports should be able to have different criteria and still be able to make a bid to be a Paralympic sport if not already one. Honestly, all wheelchair sports should be accessible to anyone who can’t do the able bodied equivalent because they can’t run or stand for a long period of time. It may mean playing around with the categories to ensure it’s fair but the pay off is accessibility for all. Secondly, we need diverse teams making these decisions. We need people with a range of disabilities and from a range of ethnic, gender and socio-economic backgrounds in the room. This will mean any blindspots will be pointed out and considered, hopefully leading to less unfair exclusion. Assessors also need to have proper education about lesser known impairments that athletes may present with. To ensure a full, fair and non biased evalation.

As a climber. I really want all aspects of the sport to be accessible to all. Yes I may be climbing like a beginner right now because I’ve been so sick this year and I still love climbing regardless of my grade and limited ability. But I also enjoyed competing when I was younger and in the beginning part of this year. If our disability impacts our sport we should have the option for both. Regardless of the underlying health condition.

Lockdown 2.0

Here we are again. The UK has entered a 4 week lockdown *touch wood*. Non essential shops are closed, restaurants, cafe’s, climbing walls.

Just as I was getting well enough to climb regularly again.

No I’m not impressed.

But it’s not the be all and end all. The schools are still open so I’m not stuck with my family all day every day, with no escape other than an “essential shop” or a walk that I don’t really have time or spoons for. I’m still finding walking quite difficult!

But seriously it’s given be a chance to work on my conditioning so I’m not constantly injured when the walls open again and hopefully I’ll be a better climber.

I can count on 2 hands the amount of times I’ve been climbing since lockdown 1.0, and lockdown 1.0 was characterised by a v sick han, collapsing multiple times a day just from walking around my old flat. Once I started feeling better and being able to stay on my feet I still wasn’t a well han. If I did climb I felt very unsafe. I often lost feeling in my legs and feet, being on the wall wasn’t an exception to this. Weak, dizzy, lots of pressure in the base of my skull. Like my whole body was about to shut down on me, and I felt like that a lot of time.

So as you can imagine I’m very deconditioned and don’t trust my legs. A chance to condition. When I can’t go anywhere else is actually quite helpful! I also might dedicate some time to baking and some ever so essential shops for supplies!

How is everyone in the UK feeling right now about 2.0? How is everyone else doing?

Let’s Talk: Discriminatory Job Adverts

Okay, this one has been coming for a while because subtly discriminative job adverts are an issue of mine and sometimes less subtly.

Why?

Because finding a job with a disability is hard enough and in the UK the Equality Act 2010 is meant to prevent disability discrimination in the workplace – from the application stage.

I’m not going to get into a debate about whether it does this well enough or not but I am going to discuss some of the parts of job adverts I’ve seen that are somewhat discriminatory.

  • We are looking for a high energy individual – My condition causes fatigue but it doesn’t mean I can’t do the job well.
  • Must be able to drive – If the job doesn’t require significant travel and is in a place accessible by public transport why do I need to be able to drive? There are many reasons why someone with a disability wouldn’t be able drive and this exempts you from the job even if driving isn’t necessary to perform the job well.
  • Must be able to lift X amount – If it’s an office role requiring mainly desk based work it would usually be a reasonable adjustment to delegate the lifting part of the role to another member of the team
  • Must be physically fit – unless it’s a role that actually requires this I think this one is self-explanatory
  • Good health record
  • Physically and mentally healthy
  • Flexible – flexible in what sense? How flexible? This may also be discriminatory to women who often have more childcare needs than men. Yes we may be flexible but only within certain parameters.

We need to work with employers to ensure these phrases don’t crop up in job advertisements, recruiters and disabled candidates are aware of the range of adjustments that may be considered reasonable and that recruiter are open to recruiting disabled candidates and understand that we can be valuable members of the workforce.

I hope that when the next generation start applying for jobs they won’t face these barriers.

Lets Talk Migraines

I know Migraine awareness week was last week but lets face it every week should be awareness week so I thought the untimely post would still be a worthwhile one.

The classical migraine is an aura (usually some sort of visual disturbance) followed by a throbbing headache in one side of the head or the other (sometimes both) combined with nausea, vomiting and dizzyness. However migraines are a lot more dense and complex than this.

Personally I get a range of different types of migraines and symptoms from migraines/that end up causing migraines. Sometimes I get an aura which is either those spots of lights in your eye or a loss of peripheral or blurring of the entire vision in my left eye.

My migraines either come from neck issues and pressure at the base of the skull, over-exerting, not wearing my blue light glasses enough or hormones.

The hormonal ones are the most painful but normally they are just that. An agonising pain in the butt (or should I say head). These ones make me want to cut my head off. These migraines also come with the extreme light and sound sensitivity that often comes from migraines, along with that distracting at best and debilitating at worst nausea.

My day to day migraine however is a lot worse more varied irritatingly day to day and is often worse on days where the pressure in the back of my head is worse. If I am unable to manage that pressure before I get a migraine with ice, or laying flat on my back with my orthopedic pillow at regular intervals then it will often get worse and cause a migraine or bring on a worse one.

I get your regular nausea and vertigo like dizziness, but also some of my numbness and tingling may be attributed to migraines. Light sensitivity is a bitch, especially as I don’t have sunglasses that I’m confident in and it’s going into autumn and winter in the UK where people don’t wear sunglasses. I find I’m much more sensitive to sunlight than relatively small amounts of artificial light. There have been days/weeks/months where I haven’t been able to open my bedroom curtains fully. I struggle to watch movies on a screen without night mode on and without blue light glasses! Especially if it has lots of flashing, action or loud noises.

I’ll be fatigued but the symptoms will make sleeping almost impossible.

The symptoms cause unbelievably thick brain fog making every bit of cognitive function so much harder, if not impossible.

It’s not just a headache.

What’s your experience of migraines?

If I were to paint my pain

If I were to paint my pain I’d paint the pressure behind my eyes, the sharp headaches around them and the migraines above them. I would paint the back of my head, the pain and pressure from the base of my skull upwards. If I were to paint my pain I’d paint my jaw. Tiring from chewing and dislocating if I dare open it too far.

If I were to paint my pain I’d paint my neck as it gets increasingly sore, the longer I sit up. The grinding and pain that is more often arising from what I presume is “sleeping funny.”

I’d paint my collarbones. Especially my right one, which has been problematic since I ran into the side of a lorry.

I’d paint my shoulders. Struggling to carry a heavy backpack on my back, partially dislocating from trying to sleep or going into the freezer.

I’d paint my right elbow. The splintering pain I get through it from putting pressure on it or the ache from doing too many pushing movements.

I’d paint the burning, searing nerve pain in my lower arms. Tormenting me, keeping my up at night yet preventing me from doing anything useful. I’d paint my wrists, my fingers and thumbs. The instability causes pain but braces and constant taping is out of my budget.

I’d paint my chest. The period pain in my chest. The fibro pain. The subluxing ribs, sometimes just from sitting up.

My stomach. Not sure whether it’s hungry or nauseous. My kidneys, a pain beyond agonising that makes it hard to breathe.

I’d paint my lower abdomen riddled with all different types of pain arising from the urniary, gyne and gastro anatomy there.

I’d paint my back. The crushing feeling down my spine, the pain from my left SI joint and the agonizing ache in my lower back. I’d paint the nerve pain from my lower left back, right down to my lower left leg.

I’d paint my hips. Unstable, painful when I walk and climb. I’d paint my knees. Painful from doing to little yet subluxing from that spontaneous dance around my room or just standing up wrong. The ligiments in the back of my knee, tight and painful from past injury.

I’d paint my lower legs. The agonising nerve pain and bone pain. My ankles – unstable and easily damaged from impact and my toes – subluxing easily.

I’d paint my entire body. Chronic pain is relentless. It’s never ending and it’s difficult to explain. It’s real and physical pain.

August was a weird one

Photo by Maddi Bazzocco on Unsplash

Another month of 2020 done!

August was a weird one. I moved back in with my family which is a bizzare adjustment. They don’t really understand my illnesses or why I can climb but should be using my wheelchair to get into town and back (which I’m not proficient at self propelling on uneven streets quite yet so need someone with me to push when needed) and i’ve gained weight because people keep on baking, I eat dinner with the family and there isn’t much easily accessible healthy food in the house. Although It’s not much compounded with how bloated I have been it doesn’t feel good. As I’m getting healthier with pacing I’m contemplating trying keto but I’m still not feeling like I’ll be healthy to reliably make meals daily once my masters starts so…

Despite seemingly feeling healthier with pacing, I have had some bad weeks as a result of too much walking. I’m v good at overestimating my limits and maybe that’s because with chronic illness are limits can change like the wind. You don’t always realise the week long payback you’ll get from simply walking to the doctors and back and I’m noticing the deterioration in my joints more from having to carry heavier things and the climbing walls being open again. I’m trying to stay conditioned when I feel well enough but that’s rare with having to manage other things I need to do.

In August I got my wheelchair. I did yet another training contract video interview (and then got rejected), participated in a negotiation competition and got to the final 12 and did many other things.

However it was also a month of disappointment and feeling like I wasn’t good enough. I got let go from a voluntary position. And admittedly it’s better for me that way as I could never have fitted into the neat little box required and my ME and suspected ADHD means I can’t proofread well. It would have ended up being too much stress – working for someone who wouldn’t understand and is quite frankly not my sort of person.

Although it made me feel really low for a bit and still does when I think about it because it’s a literal failure. I know it’s for the best. I just wish I was given a second chance to prove myself.

I also have the feeling that my family really doesn’t support me for leaving my job, despite it being necessary for my health and to be able to pursue what I want from life.

But that’s life. It’s full of ups and downs.

On Ableism becoming a wheelchair user

I made the decision the other day to get a wheelchair. It’s a decision I really should have made years ago but I was too scared and I could walk okay when I needed to…. so it was fine right? I mean not really but it’s hard to come to the realisation that you need a aid that many people see is only for people who are paralysed or otherwise literally cannot walk when you can. Adrenaline will keep you on your feet it just really hurts, the pressure in your head gets exponentially worse and it cases payback which limits your ability to do other things. It’s also hard to justify needing a wheelchair when you can climb. I don’t know why because climbing and walking are two completely different types of movement and your able to sit on the mats and rest inbetween.

It’s scary anticipating neighbours simultaneously seeing you walk to the car to go to your nans or the climbing wall or wherever else one goes in the car, but go out in the chair to go to town or the doctors or wherever once I have built up the ability to self propel I may go on my own.

There’s definitely a lot of people my parents included who don’t understand how chronic illnesses fluctuate. If I pace myself okay I can function and with my ME feel okay. Not healthy person okay but ME/CFS okay. Like the day I’m writing this. There’s some inner energy but the symptoms are still there. With my EDS yes my joints would be better if I could get myself more conditioned by climbing more but even then some days they are worse than others. Some days I can’t go into the freezer without partially dislocating a shoulder, others I can.

There’s also a lot of people who think people in wheelchairs somehow also have an intellectual disability – like we can’t speak for themselves.

And the awful “wheelchair bound” no for me it would be some freedom outside of the house with less payback and I know others feel that way.

It’s difficult navigating spaces that aren’t really made for us but it’s better than being stuck in the house.

And that. That would be amazing!

Does anyone else use a wheelchair for certain outings? What ableism have you faced?

The Things I do Because of my Chronic Illnesses That are Often Misread

Sorry it’s been a bit radio silence here lately! I’m struggling with my ME and relying on adrenaline, caffeine, sugar and sheer necessity to get through everything I do. With feeling so god damn awful and trying to just carry on I thought I’d share some things I do because of my chronic illness.

1. Resting my head on the table or my knee whilst I handwrite notes or an exam – I started doing this at school when I was 10 and I always got told off for it. But it was just more comfortable like that. I didn’t know why at the time but as my symptoms have got worse I have realised it’s a thing I do to try and alleviate dizziness and head pressure and just keep going. Fun fact head on desk is how I got through my Land Law and Trusts Law exams.

2. Never having my feet on the floor and finding all manner of awkward positions to sit in so my feet are at hip height – helps with fatigue and dizziness and is just more comfortable.

3. Leaning against whatever there is to lean on

4. Constantly moving around if asked to sit/stand in one place – shifting weight and finding different positions helps with pain.

5. Working from bed or the sofa – I’m often dizzy and suffering from pressure in my head or I’m nauseous and in a lot of pain. My bed and the sofa both mean I can alternate sitting and laying.

6. Picking up my phone far too often when I’m meant to be working but my ME is causing severe head pressure and I just can’t concentrate – Really trying to cut the phone addiction. This doesn’t help I just am not good at sitting, or laying and blankly staring at what I’m meant to be doing.

7. Walking slowly – I’m sorry, I simply can’t keep up due to my pain and fatigue. Please be understanding if we are out together and walk at a pace I am able to manage on that day.

8. Grabbing hold of walls or using them to guide me I often get dizzy and go into pre-syncope. When my vision blurs due to this or I just feel unsteady on my feet I often use the walls to help me navigate my way to the bathroom or wherever in the house it is I’m going.

9. Taking my time when changing position (i.e laying to sitting and sitting to standing) – head pressure and dizziness is a bitch and it definitely gets worse when I change position.

These are just some of the things I do due to my symptoms that people may misread.

What do you do because of your chronic illness?